SEPTEMBER PEPPER TO REMEMBER

 

Poppin’ Poblano Pepper

The Stuff “ed” Dreams Are Made of

The poblano is a mild chili pepper originating in the state of Puebla, Mexico. Dried, it is called ancho or chile ancho, from the Mexican Spanish name ancho (“wide”) or chile ancho (“wide chile”).  Stuffed fresh and roasted it is popular in chili rellenos poblanos.

Genuinely Mild.
Occasionally Wild.

While poblanos tend to have a mild flavor, occasionally and unpredictably they can have significant heat. Different peppers from the same plant have been reported to vary substantially in heat intensity. The ripened red poblano is significantly hotter and more flavorful than the less ripe, green poblano. An immature poblano is dark purplish green in color, but the mature fruits eventually turn a red so dark as to be nearly black.

Poblanos grow in zones 10-12 and do best with a soil pH between 7.0 and 8.5. They typically prefer full sunlight and may require additional support for the growing fruits during harvest in late summer. A poblano takes around 200 days from seed to harvest and requires soil temperatures of at least 64 °F to germinate.

Check Out This Great Recipe:

Poblano, Bacon and Cheddar Skillet Cornbread

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 fresh poblano chile peppers
  • 6 to 8 slices center-cut bacon (about 4 ounces total)
  • 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1 1/4 cups flour
  • 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 4 large eggs, well beaten
  • 2 cups grated sharp cheddar cheese
  • 2 cups fresh or frozen/defrosted corn kernels

DIRECTIONS

Place the poblanos directly on a gas burner over medium-high heat. Cook, turning them as needed, for 10 to 15 minutes or until they are charred all over. (Alternatively, position an oven rack 4 inches from the broiling element and preheat the broiler. Arrange the poblanos on a piece of aluminum foil and place on the rack to broil for 10 to 15 minutes; turn frequently until charred all over.)

Transfer the poblanos to a zip-top bag and seal, or place in a bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap. When they are cool enough to handle, discard the blackened skin, stem, ribs, and seeds, then dice the remaining flesh. (It is easier to remove the skin under running water, but some cooks say that washes away flavor.) Cut the flesh into small dice; the yield is a packed 3/4 cup.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a plate with a few layers of paper towels.

Heat a 9- or 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and cook until crispy. Transfer the bacon to the lined plate to drain. Turn off the heat, leaving the fat in the skillet.

Combine the cornmeal, flour, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and black pepper in a mixing bowl.

Whisk together the milk, cream, and eggs in a large liquid measuring cup, then stir into the cornmeal mixture until just incorporated. Add the diced poblano, the cheese, and corn. Crumble the bacon over the bowl. Pour all but 1 tablespoon of the rendered bacon fat from the skillet into the batter, stirring gently to incorporate.

Heat that same skillet over medium heat. Once the remaining bacon fat shimmers, pour the cornbread batter evenly into the skillet. Transfer to the oven; bake for 30 to 40 minutes or until golden brown and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean.

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Preparation Potpourri

Preparation methods include: dried, coated in whipped egg and fried, stuffed, or in mole sauces. It is also usually used in the widely found dish chili relleno. Poblanos are popular in the United States and can be found in grocery stores throughout the country.

After being roasted and peeled (which improves the texture by removing the waxy skin), poblano peppers are preserved by either canning or freezing.  Storing them in airtight containers keeps them for several months.  When dried, the poblano becomes a broad, flat, heart-shaped pod; from this form, it is often ground into a powder used as the flavoring in various dishes. Bruce’s Foods favors the poblano as part of the family for our amazing collection of sauces. 

Approximate length

Calories per pepper

Dietary Vitamin A milligrams

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